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Watch the Bond/Star Wars Mashup You Never Knew You Wanted

Star Wars

One of the internet’s core strengths as far as I’m concerned is taking two things that shouldn’t really work together and mashing them together to make something awesome. There’s that Monster Squad/Suicide Squad mashup trailer from a while ago, and the odd trend of drawing Disney Princesses as everything other than Disney Princesses is certainly interesting to watch, even if I don’t have any personal stake in the properties involved. And now, how about a combination of James Bond and The Empire Strikes Back? No, some clever editor hasn’t somehow replaced Mark Hamill with Sean Connery, though it would be fun to see the whiny farmboy replaced with a hairy Scotsman. No, what we’ve got here is a new opening sequence for the film, done in the style of a James Bond opening credits sequence.

The video comes from Kurt Rauffer, and uses an unused Spectre themesong by Radiohead. So hopefully Radiohead’s your bag. Better than Sam Smith, at least. The sequence takes a lot of Star Wars imagery and plays around with it in the Bond opening style, though before you ask no, there aren’t any women in Slave Leia bikinis, and I kind of respect the animator for not taking that easy option. There’s a sequence that recreates the Death Star battle from New Hope, but with all the fighters represented glowing wireframes, like you see on the targeting screens. The animation is really great looking, with an impressive level of polish and attention to detail. Unless I miss my guess, there’s a bit of actual model work going on as well, and more model work is always good in my books. If Rian Johnson wanted to seriously mix things up for Episode 8, he might want to give this fella a call.

Check out the video below

Star Wars – Episode V “The Empire Strikes Back” Homage (Title Sequence) from KROFL on Vimeo.


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