‘Vertigo,’ ‘Beasts of the Southern Wild,’ and the Best of 2012 so far

- Advertisement -

Unless you’ve been under a rock for the last week, you probably heard that Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo unseated Citizen Kane for the #1 spot on Sight & Sound’s critics’ poll of the greatest films of all time. Ricky D, Justine Smith, and Simon Howell weigh that result along with Vertigo itself before tackling one of the year’s most acclaimed films, the Sundance breakout Beasts of the Southern Wild, as well as each taking a crack at the best flicks of ’12 so far.

[powerpress]
4 Comments
  1. Anonymous says

    I’m a huge fan of Vertigo and there are so many points to make about your discussion about of the movie, but instead of writing an essay I’ll just make a couple points.

    Ricky didn’t buy Judy and Scottie falling madly in love so quickly or their chemistry is not obvious. This “love” for each other begins with Scottie’s obsession. I think part of this is shown just through the endless driving and following and ultimately saving her from drowning. Madeline can’t show any feelings she may have because she’s playing a part. Scottie becomes obsessed twice, the first time leaving him so depressed he suffers from melancholia. (That’s such a huge emotion that even Mozart can’t fix.) When Scottie shows up at Judy’s apartment, she still can’t let on that she likes him because it blows her cover that she was part of the charade, and that she’s a liar, a cheat and an accomplice to murder. (Would you put that on your online profile?) So she tries to get rid of him. But she eventually lets him in and does show that she’s into him when she lets Scottie remake her, which today might be seen as a dom/sub relationship. This part of the story happened at a time when people didn’t (usually) just dive into bed with each other, and often not on film. It doesn’t seem realistic to today’s world when more people would just hook up using online and mobile dating. But Scottie and Judy were having a hot and heavy affair, 1950’s style. So ultimately, I think this chemistry isn’t typical given today’s standards but is there and has to be seen through the obstacles of the charade.

    Also, it’s true that the movie does end abruptly. That would normally bother me too until I think of the affect that has, which is that it leaves me with my jaw dropped. I’m left unnerved. Judy died just like Madeline and Scottie loses her twice. (The nun is like a ghost emerging and is really only the catalyst for the action.) I feel that if the story were to continue from that point that it only would diminish that wow factor. So good choice omitting Scottie and Midge listening to the radio.

  2. Mario in Philly says

    I’m a huge fan of Vertigo and there are so many points to make about your discussion about of the movie, but instead of writing an essay I’ll just make a couple points.

    Ricky didn’t buy Judy and Scottie falling madly in love so quickly. Why this does work is their “love” for each other begins with Scottie’s obsession. I think this begins through the endless driving and following and ultimately saving her from drowning. Madeline can’t show any feelings she may have because she’s playing a part. Scottie becomes obsessed twice, the first time leaving him so depressed he suffers from melancholia. (That’s such a huge emotion that even Mozart can’t fix.) When Scottie shows up at Judy’s apartment, she still can’t let on that she likes him because it blows her cover that she was part of the charade, and that she’s a liar, a cheat and an accomplice to murder. (Would you put that on your online profile?) So she tries to get rid of him. But she eventually does show that she’s into him when she lets Scottie remake her, which today might be seen as a dom/sub relationship. This part of the story happened at a time when people didn’t (usually) just dive into bed with each other, and often not on film. It doesn’t seem realistic to today’s world when more people would just hook up using online and mobile dating. But Scottie and Judy were having a hot and heavy affair, 1950’s style. So ultimately, I think this chemistry isn’t typical given today’s standards but is there and has to be seen through the obstacles of the charade.

    Also, it’s true that the movie does end abruptly. That would normally bother me too until I think of the affect that has, which is that it leaves me with my jaw dropped. I’m left unnerved. Judy died just like Madeline and Scottie loses her twice. (The nun is like a ghost emerging and is really only the catalyst for the action.) I feel that if the story were to continue from that point that it only would diminish that wow factor. So good choice omitting Scottie and Midge listening to the radio.

  3. Ricky says

    Hey Peter,

    Not only do I agree with your comment, but I was actually telling Simon yesterday that I wanted to go back and edit the show and trim down all the unnecessary banter.

  4. Peter says

    I’m a huge fan in general, but I think Ricky and Justine need to resolve their issues. There’s too many petty, pedantic arguments over insignificant details whenever the two of them are on a podcast together, instead of actual in-depth criticism and discussion. Why can’t you all just get along?!

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.