More stories

  • in

    The Unity Squad is back in ‘Uncanny Avengers’ #1

    All throughout the issue, readers are granted a great example of colors from Richard Isanove, and how they blend to make each character look distinct. Every member of the Team has colors that render them dynamic and lets them exude a personality all on their own. If this issue is anything to go by, the Uncanny Avengers will be in good hands under Gerry Duggan’s dialogue, character portrayals as well Ryan Stegman and the rest of the art team making the Unity Squad a team to look out for. More

  • in

    50 Greatest Comic Book Movie Adaptations

    10. Watchmen How do you go about adapting a supposedly unadapatable text? While faithful translations tend not to artistically successful, a faithful adaptation with fetishistic attention to detail can create something unique. While Robert Rodriguez and Frank Miller had it comparatively easy when adapting Miller’s Sin City to screen as they more or less would […] More

  • in

    Box Office Sabermetrics: Universal’s Year of Moneyball

    Box Office Sabermetrics is a weekly column that will attempt to apply the statistical analysis Sabermetrics, used in Baseball, to the box office results each weekend. Universal Studios is having a great year. In fact they’re having a year where they are having the biggest box office returns this year by a long shot – […] More

  • in

    Six Reasons to be Excited About All-New, All-Different Marvel

    While DC Comics attempts to play catch-up with their “Divergence” marketing campaign, highlighting new and more diverse status-quo switch-ups along with some #1 issues, Marvel Comics continues to kick ass with more awesome comic books. After Secret Wars, an epic event comic from Jonathan Hickman that changes up the continuity by mashing together the Ultimate and […] More

  • in

    ‘Civil War’ shows superheroes who compromise

    Civil War was a massive Marvel crossover event running from 2006 to 2007 and tied into virtually every Marvel comic including cosmic ones, like Nova, and quirky teen ones, like Runaways. The comic begins with the New Warriors (a team of perpetually C-Listers) fighting a group of supervillains to garner better ratings for their reality TV show, which leads to the villain Nitro blowing up a school in Stamford, Connecticut leading to many civilian casualties. This leads to Tony Stark, Reed Richards, the Avengers, and SHIELD supporting the Superhuman Registration Act, which bans secret identities, implements mandatory training for young heroes, and makes superheroes agents of SHIELD. This is opposed by Captain America, who doesn’t want to hunt down his fellow heroes, and the conflict begins as all the heroes of the Marvel Universe must either choose the Pro-Reg or Anti-Reg side. More

  • in

    Ultron Arrives Misanthropically in ‘Avengers’ #55

    Avengers #55 marks the first real appearance of Avengers arch-villain, but the Avengers lineup he faces is quite odd. It’s a truly kooky quartet of the recently introduced Black Panther, Hawkeye, Wasp, and Goliath, which is one of Hank Pym’s dozen or so codenames. They open the issue as prisoners of a new, mostly filled with second stringers Masters of Evil, including “sultan of sound” Klaw, Radioactive Man, Whirlwind, and the “mysterious” Melter. Their strings are being pulled by the Crimson Cowl, a truly mysterious figure, who was revealed to be the Avengers’ butler Edwin Jarvis. However, writer Roy Thomas subverts the overused “the butler did it” cliche and throws in an even crazier plot twist that the robot Ultron-5 is behind the Avengers’ capture and infiltration of their HQ. More

  • in

    ‘Secret Wars’ #1 is an epic, fun, and bloated event comic

    For the most part, Hickman and Ribic keep Secret Wars #1 from being too bloated with timely reaction close-ups of characters, and little jokes or insights into them, like Thanos being disgusted with humanity’s fear of death or the aforementioned Rocket joke. Esad Ribic’s storytelling makes this comic work as a pure work of superhero action with cutting panels for his sharp fight scenes. He also uses well-placed montages as the stakes continue to get higher as the comic progresses. Secret Wars #1 is a true superhero epic with wide-screen action, the occasional character insight, and real consequences even if it may be a little too expansive at times. More

  • in

    Sordid Cinema #96: ‘Avengers: Age of Ultron’

    It was expected that Avengers: Age of Ultron wouldn’t recapture the excitement of seeing Earth’s Mightiest Heroes assembled onscreen for the first time, but how good is Joss Whedon’s latest entry into the Marvel cinematic universe? Joining us this week is Sound on Sight news-editor Brian Welk to help us dissect the movie and discus the […] More

  • in

    To Better Know a Hero: Quicksilver and Scarlet Witch

    Quicksilver Real Name Pietro Django Maximoff First Appearance X-Men #4, March 1964 Nicknames & Aliases Pietro Frank, Matheo Maximoff, Powers & Abilities Quicksilver possess the mutant ability to move and think exceedingly fast. He can run at speeds up to Mach 5, and his body is designed to survive the rigors of moving at such […] More

  • in

    ‘Avengers: Rage of Ultron’ shows strings are all the rage

    Avengers: Rage of Ultron Written by Rick Remender Art by Jerome Opena, Pepe Larraz, Mark Morales Published by Marvel Comics You might have heard of this tiny little film called Avengers: Age of Ultron hitting theaters on May 1st. Marvel wanted to prep casual readers and hardcore readers alike and published  a bold, game-changing, original […] More

  • in

    ‘Avengers #41’ moves some big pieces on the chessboard

    Avengers #41 Written by Jonathan Hickman Art by Mike Deodato Colors by Frank Martin Published by Marvel Comics With a cover that is an exact copy of Mark Millar and Bryan Hitch’s The Ultimates #1, Avengers #41 brings the good ol’ (or not so old) Ultimate Universe into Jonathan Hickman’s epic multiversal vision for the Avengers and Marvel Universe as a whole. It also deals with the […] More

  • in

    Why Marvel Doesn’t Need Spider-Man

    Many were hoping that when Kevin Feige took the stage to unveil the third phase of the Marvel Cinematic Universe that he would have a friendly neighborhood Spider-man in tow with him, but alas, it was not to be. All of Marvel’s output was plotted out through 2019, but Spider-man’s name was nowhere to be […] More

Load More
Congratulations. You've reached the end of the internet.