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    Twin Peaks, Ep. 2.14, “Double Play”: A clash of tones

    One of the most successful things about Twin Peaks was its uniquely seamless ability to balance the dark and the light. Thanks largely to the competent handling of David Lynch, the series has become known for both its horrifying and surreal moments as well as its goofy humour, and for the unparalleled way (at least for a time) it could flit between them, combine them, and manipulate them. One single scene could be simultaneously terrifying and chuckle-inducing, and it became up to you to determine how you were supposed to feel about that. It was challenging, but remarkably and consistently effective. More

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    Twin Peaks, Ep. 2.13, “Checkmate”: Who cares?

    One of the early ideas behind Twin Peaks was that the murder of Laura Palmer was never intend to be the central focus of the show for long—in fact, David Lynch and Mark Frost are often cited that if they’d had their way the murderer would never be revealed. Instead, it was meant as a mechanism to introduce us an audience into the world of Twin Peaks, meeting the various eccentrics and peeling back the curtain—red or otherwise—hanging over their secrets. The town would generate stories on its own, and eventually questions of Laura and her death would fade away into the ether. More

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    Twin Peaks, Ep. 2.11: “Masked Ball”: Off the board, off the wall

    The long-awaited revival of Twin Peaks returned from its own horrific limbo in the Black Lodge earlier this month, when David Lynch announced on Twitter that he’d worked out a deal with Showtime to honor his original commitment to direct the third season—only six weeks after he’d walked away from the project in a similarly public fashion. The news was met with universal acclaim and relief, because after being told this unique show was coming back, it felt wrong that the auteur from whose mind it sprang had to be involved to usher his creation into its next stage of life. They wanted to see it so much, in fact, that the show’s original actors even took to social media to offer character-specific similes on what losing him would mean to the show. More

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    Damn Good Podcast – Twin Peaks S01E07: The Last Evening

    For the finale of season one, Twin Peaks borrows a page from Dallas. Mark Frost writes and directs a finale with multiple cliffhangers, uncomfortable moments, great performances from multiple characters, and terrible performances from a few others. This is the last Damn Good Podcast before our hiatus to cover Season 3 of NBC’s Hannibal for […] More

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    Damn Good Podcast – Twin Peaks S01E06: Realization Time

    A beautifully shot and directed penultimate episode of the season from Caleb Deschanel is hampered by an at times underwhelming script by Harley Peyton that seems to take a surprising number of shortcuts. It’s still very solid television, leading up to a “come back next week” style cliffhanger, but it pales in comparison with last […] More

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    The Art-House Horror of ‘Lost Highway’

    “Funny how secrets travel,” David Bowie croons as the music thumps. The camera zooms down a dark desolate highway, illuminated only by the twin beams of a speeding car’s headlights. This is the beginning of David Lynch’s Lost Highway, and it sets the mood for the chaos to come. Lynch rose to auteur status with […] More

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    VOD: David Lynch’s surreal sitcom/web series is back online for your viewing pleasure

    Originally consisting of a series of eight short episodes shown exclusively on David Lynch’s website, Rabbits was eventually taken down and not available to watch anywhere until it was recently released on DVD in the Lime Green Set, a collection of Lynch’s films, in a re-edited four-episode version. If you can’t afford the 10-disk collection, […] More

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