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    Glee, Ep 5.19, “Old Dog, New Tricks” takes us back to the good old days

    Chris Colfer, the actor responsible for everyone’s favorite countertenor Kurt Hummel, makes his television writing debut with Glee’s second to last episode of the season, “Old Dog, New Tricks”. While Colfer is new to writing TV scripts, he’s not new to writing. The actor turned author is responsible for two New York Time’s bestselling children’s novels and an screenplay for the award-winning film Struck By Lightning. More

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    Glee, Ep 5.18, “Back-up Plan” is overly ambitious

    Glee season five is all about Rachel bouncing back and forth between legitimately nice and completely intolerable. Finally after years of scrapping for solos in Glee Club, her lifelong goal has come true. She starts on Broadway while just barely in college at her dream school, playing the lead role in an iconic revival. Oh and did we mention it’s the lead role, the title role, Fanny Brice, the Funny Girl herself? The character who is essentially Rachel Berry’s spirit animal? You guessed it, she gets bored after a month and attempts to throw the whole production under a giant bus. More

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    Glee, Ep. 5.17, “Opening Night” is everything we didn’t know we wanted for Rachel

    Glee’s “Opening Night” is everything we didn’t know we wanted for Rachel Berry. Despite her faults, somehow we still find ourselves rooting for Rachel. Maybe it’s the fact that losing Finn seemed like more than any one person, or character, should have to bear. Whatever the reason, this episode is a welcome relief for the often frustrating character. More

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    Glee, Ep. 5.15, “Bash” is poignant but not for the squeamish

    The somber opening to Glee’s “Bash” sets the tone for the episode and it’s a somber one. The acapella version of “No One is Alone”, originally from the musical Into the Woods, is haunting and beautiful. Somehow even the comedic relief, Sam Evans, is quiet and that speaks volumes to the seriousness of the issue being addressed.

    It is always a treat to see Lea Michele or Darren Criss do a Broadway number. Despite Madame Tibaduex’s disapproval, it is especially nice to see them perform together, this time doing their own theatrical rendition of “Broadway Baby” from Follies. I’d imagine due to the close proximity between Michele and Criss’s characters’, Rachel and Blaine will probably be singing some more Broadway ditties in the future. More

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    Glee, Ep 5.14, “New York, New York” piques our interest

    After failing to create any original story lines or legitimate interest with the newbies at McKinley High, the creators and writers of Glee made a game-changing decision last week. They cut their losses, crushed the underdogs with a fatal almost win at nationals, and set up a new base camp in New York, New York. This is a giant leap in the right direction and this episode is proof. More

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    Glee, Ep 5.13, “New Directions” sends the Glee Club in Every Direction

    Good news, Glee fans. The Bermuda Triangle school year at McKinley is actually over. Seniors Artie, Sam, Tina, Blaine, Becky, and even Brittany, back from her imprisonment at MIT, have all flipped their tassel over to the other side. They are moving on, but not before leaving us with one more iconic moment. “Don’t Stop Believin'” was quite obviously the only song to end the Glee Club’s five year run and this version does an amazing job of pulling the original characters and the newbies together in a single, meaningful act. While Kurt, played by Chris Colfer, lends his voice as the male lead and shows off his vocal range in the process, “Don’t Stop Believin'” is missing something without Finn. The chemistry between Kurt and Rachel could never mimic the sparks between her and Finn; intentional or not, the missing piece is a bittersweet tribute to both Finn Hudson and fallen actor Cory Monteith. More

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    Glee, Ep. 5.12, “100” takes fans back to the good old days

    Glee’s 100th episode, cleverly entitled “100”, is a reminder of what’s been missing since most the original New Direction members graduated. What could have been, in turns, a little too sweet and fake ends up being a fun episode with enough bite to keep most of the tears at bay. Seeing the gang back together in the choir room singing the classics is nostalgic and unsurprisingly, everyone is back to their high school antics. More

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    Glee, Ep. 5.10, “Trio” has fans asking why

    Glee’s “Trio” leaves fans asking question after question. This is clearly a filler episode with just a few little bits of foreshadowing sprinkled in. Perhaps the writers and producers are beginning to regret extending McKinley’s school year across multiple seasons. Here are just some of questions we’ve been asking ourselves: More

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    Glee, Ep. 5.09, “Frenemies” is friendly enough

    Glee’s mid-season opener is friendly enough, with lots of drama and some truly impressive musical numbers, but despite the music, fans are once again finding these beloved characters falling back on bad habits and hysterics. Though it finally started to feel like Rachel was actually finding herself in New York, after four tumultuous years at McKinley and the loss of her first love, Finn Hudson, she’s hit a new low. Watching her slap Santana across the face prompts flashbacks to the time Rachel sent Sunshine Corazon to a crack house so she wouldn’t be able to audition for Glee. While Santana probably should have tempered Rachel by letting her know she planned to audition, one can’t really blame her for wanting to avoid Rachel’s wrath twice over and she is also in rare form this week, slinging every possible insult. Perhaps having those two tolerate each other really is too much to ask. Regardless, there is a lot of really funny dialogue between them. More

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    The Televerse #120- Informed Opinions: Physical Disabilities on Television

    Several shows may be on hiatus, but there’s still plenty of TV to fill the podcast this week. We kick things off with the comedies, including the Psych musical, before moving on to the week’s genre offerings and finishing up with the dramas, including the finales of Homeland and Masters of Sex. Then we welcome back SoS’s Amanda Williams to discuss portrayals of physical disabilities on television in our latest Informed Opinions segment. More

  • Jessica Capshaw in Grey's Anatomy
    in

    The Televerse #120- Informed Opinions: Physical Disabilities on Television

    Several shows may be on hiatus, but there’s still plenty of TV to fill the podcast this week. We kick things off with the comedies, including the Psych musical, before moving on to the week’s genre offerings and finishing up with the dramas, including the finales of Homeland and Masters of Sex. Then we welcome back SoS’s Amanda Williams to discuss portrayals of physical disabilities on television in our latest Informed Opinions segment. More

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