Humberto Ramos

‘Extraordinary X-Men’ #1 is Grimdark and Reductive

Extraordinary X-Men #1 will probably be seen as energetically drawn and colored sacrilege by both long time X-Men fans and ones, who jumped on with Bendis’ work. And for new fans, it’s darkness for darkness’ sake as the X-Men’s outsider metaphor is drowned out by the Inhumans and turned into yet another post-apocalyptic story. Lemire also makes a few stumbles in his plotting, like having characters tell about an upcoming mystery involving Cyclops and a cure for mutant disease instead of seeding compelling visual clues or starting to build arcs for characters. And his final page cliffhanger, which was probably meant to be the triumphant return of a “dead” X-Men, falls flat because it already happened in a Secret Wars tie-in. This is one is probably on editorial though. Even though Humberto Ramos’ manga influenced, yet wide-screen art adds some pep to the X-Men’s powers and fight scenes to go along with Edgar Delgado’s bold color palette, Extraordinary X-Men #1 is a misstep for the franchise in plotting, themes, and characterization.

‘Fairy Quest: Outcasts’ #1 dares you to deviate

Imagine someone else wrote the story of your life, determined your character traits, and threatened to wipe your memories should you decide to deviate from your path. This is the world Little Red Riding Hood (Red) and Woof (The Big Bad Wolf) find themselves fleeing in Fairy Quest: Outcasts.

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