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    ‘Back to the Future’ #2 Establishes the Series’ Identity

    this pair of stories successfully builds on the foundation laid by the first issue, continuing the anthology approach that allows stories to take place from all over the Back to the Future timeline (and, essentially, multiverse) but also developing its own internal continuity that helps the series stand as its own thing (and not just as an extension of the movies), while also having the kind of fun with plotting that only comes when a narrative has access to a time machine. More

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    ‘Back to the Future’ #1 Features a Fun Approach to Licensed Stories

    Most licensed fiction takes one of two approaches to its stories: tales set before the main narrative, showing what characters were up to before their original story, or stories set after, showing the further adventures of the characters. IDW’s new Back to the Future series, subtitled “Untold Tales and Alternate Timelines” intends to do both (and more), telling tales set before, after, during and sideways to the events of the movies, as Bob Gale, co-writer of the three films, is joined by a series of writers and artists for a unique kind of anthology series. More

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    ‘My Little Pony Friends Forever’ #21 is about finding friendship and belonging

    My Little Pony Friends Forever # 21 has Spike and Zacora dare to solve a problem of an unknown illness. Writer Ted Anderson crafts a plot which flows with a good pace and has tender character movements. Artist Agnes Garbowska and color assistant Lauren Perry produce gentle colors and fitting mood in the art to support Anderson’s tale. For the readers who love My Little Pony Friendship is Magic or need something for a young child, My Little Pony Friends Forever # 21 is a heartwarming comic about belonging and friendship. More

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    ‘Jem and the Holograms’ #8 Opens Ballady and Rocks on the Finish

    Jem and the Holograms remains the pastel and neon-colored antidote to overconsumption of gritty, dark comics. Cleanse your palate and soul with this charming series. As the middle issue of the Viral! arc, #8 has a ballad-slow first half and then starts to rock in the second. Delicious twists in the rising action and humorous character interactions create delightful, pulp-comedy fun. More

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    ‘My Little Pony Fiendship is Magic’ #2 shows how power corrupts

    How are villains created? Are they born out of the pits of Hades? Are they raised to act like they do? What creates a villain and how they see good and evil? My Little Pony Fiendship is Magic # 2 reveals the origin of the villain Tirek and his path which would lead him toward being banished later in the My Little Pony Friendship is Magic series. The writer, Christina Rice, shows Tirek as a power hungry child, but leaves hints to take into consideration as My Little Pony Friendship is Magic weaves a story about Tirek and his early life. More

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    ‘D4VE’ #1 is the blue-collar robot comedy you have always wanted

    Do you constantly find yourself waking up in the morning filled with absolute zero ambition to start your day? Does it feel like each and every day blends together due to the trap of repetitions you find yourself in? If you are a robot that feels this way, than D4VE is perfect for you! Originally available through Monkeybrain comics digitally, IDW presents the journey again on physical print beginning with D4VE #1. More

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    ‘Shadow Show’ #1 adapts the influenced wonder of Ray Bradbury’s work

    Ray Bradbury is a name embedded in the great mythos of science fiction literature. His ability to work through the wide ranges of literature, from novels to short stories, would bring Bradbury to adapt some of his work into the realm of comic books. As explained in the introduction for Shadow Show, Bradbury was fascinated with the fantastic at a very young age, burrowing from his obsession with the newspaper Sunday comics like Buck Rogers in the 25th Century. More

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