justice league

‘Justice League’ #48 charges toward the endgame

Justice League #48, which is part 8 of the DC Universe spanning event “Darkseid War, is winding up for a slamming finish. There’s a lot to be said for an event sized book being told mainly in one title and one-shots over the course of the run. Geoff Johns, Jason Fabok, and Brad Anderson continue to maintain a level of epic sized awesome inside this core title and not one part of this book dissapoints.

Gods are Forever in ‘Justice League’ #47

With the clock winding down and with only 3 issues in the War to go, not all of the characters are at the forefront in Justice League #47, but it works lest the already packed title become overstuffed with players. With the main artist back on to finish the event, the “Darkseid War” should begin to wrap up character arcs and pick up steam to change the landscape of DC Universe in issue 50.

The Darkseid War shifts in ‘Justice League’ #45

The Darkseid War rages on and is proving to be the biggest and largest story DC has told yet in the New 52 and DCYou era through the Justice League title. Readers are treated to an artistic switch with Francis Manapul and Brian Buccellato, who were the team that ushered in a new era for The Flash at the New 52’s inception to give us this aftermath of the insanity that went down in issue #44.

Top 10 Things I’m Looking Forward to at New York Comic Con 2015

On Saturday and Sunday of New York Comic Con, the stakes get higher and the lines get longer as big studios, like Marvel, WB, and 20th Century Fox, bring out their movie and TV stars to sign autographs and appear on panels about their upcoming blockbusters and fall TV hits. You can catch the pilot of Fox’s Lucifer and CBS’ Supergirl based on the DC Comics properties, or decided to kick old school with several reunions of shows and movies, including Clueless, All That, and two masterpieces of nerdy TV that made my list.

Was DC Comics’ New 52 Successful?

Welcome to the new column “Comics Issues” where two Sound on Sight comics writers debate a important or controversial comics industry topic. First up, we discuss whether the DC New 52 was a successful initiative or not. Feel free to post your opinion in the comments below.

‘Wonder Woman’ #40: how to ruin Wonder Woman

As DC’s next big soft-core reboot begins underway, one of the most troubling facts to acknowledge is that despite the compay’s claims to have a new marketing strategy with a wider target audience in mind, that some of their most troubling decisions dating all the way back to 2011 are going nowhere. Case in point, just about everything involving DC’s handling of Wonder Woman, not just in comics but also video games, animated movies, and very likely the upcoming live action films, seems to be stripping the character of the revolutionary feminist philosophies that she was born from and replacing it with the same toxic masculinity straight out of 300. DC has taken William Moulton Marston and swapped him for Frank Miller and it still remains one of the New 52’s cardinal sins that intends to live on beyond Convergence.

‘Wonder Woman’ #36 – A New Run Begins

Wonder Woman #36 marks the end of the lengthy Brian Azzarello/Cliff Chiang run which has defined Diana Prince since the New 52’s inception. Unfortunately, many of the newer elements introduced have been controversial to say the least. It’s difficult to talk about Wonder Woman on the conceptual level as she’s been one of the most reworked and re-imagined A-list heroes in DC’s entire roster. This makes avoiding hang ups about personal interpretations on how the character should and shouldn’t work a challenge, so please keep that in mind.

‘Justice League: Origin’ the worst way to introduce the Justice League

Created as the flagship title of the New 52 and the opening arc for this new era of comics, Justice League “Origin” is a cringe-worthy retelling of the League’s beginnings. Despite having the talented Geoff Johns handling story and drawn by Jim Lee, Justice League “Origin” is a boring and underwhelming tale.

Batman #35 is Superhero Storytelling at a Mythic Level

After spending a year developing the origin and mythos of Batman, Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo turn him loose in Batman #35 and show him at his prime fighting some of Earth’s mightiest heroes. The scale of the comic is huge as Batman battles the various Justice League members, and Capullo’s art shows their might in comparison to Batman’s mortality. The comic opens at the Royal Theatre in Gotham, which has spent lots of money on a special crane so there can be a literal “deus ex machina” in a staging of the Oresteia. Snyder and Capullo stage their narrative like a Greek tragedy giving Batman his own fatal flaw in the story. From Batman #35, it seems that the “Endgame” will be looking at Batman as legend while having many twists and turns along the way. Snyder does a good job showing Batman’s unique contingency plans for stopping the Justice League while Capullo shows them in action from Wonder Woman’s window breaking power to Flash’s crackling super speed. If anything, Batman #35 is an argument for why Greg Capullo should draw Justice League. FCO Plascencia continues to set the mood with his colors from the mix of somber and bright coloring in the theatre to Batman’s shadowy greys and blacks and the various color schemes for the Justice League members.

Superman Salvaged: How to Fix ‘Man of Steel’

Man of Steel can best be described as inconsistent and certainly a missed opportunity. Now, with news of the mutated sequel coming in every week, it seems a good time to really explore these flaws.

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