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    The Definitive Kubrickian Films: 40-31

    As we spend a month looking at the great Stanley Kubrick, we can also look at the filmmakers who were clearly influenced by Kubrick. “Kubrickian” films tend to exercise incredible control of the camera, are extremely ambitious, tend to deal with much weightier themes, and always maintain a sense of mystery, like a there’s an […] More

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    TIFF 2013: ‘The Last of Robin Hood’ is a heartbreaking Hollywood tale of first and last love

    The Last of Robin Hood depicts the last romance of Errol Flynn’s life from the not-so-tender age of 48 until his death. Who was the lucky girl? Beverly Aadland. One person’s definition of luck is most people’s definition of statutory rape—something that Flynn had some trouble with before—as Miss Aadland was under 18 at the time. This is the crux of the conundrum behind this story and what would regularly confound a filmmaker in bringing it to the screen—even Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita screenplay was rejected and reworked by Stanley Kubrick. Fortunately for the audience, Richard Glatzer and Wash Westmoreland are no regular filmmakers (see Grief, The Fluffer, Quinceanera). They have written and directed a film about three protagonists (Beverly Aadland, her mother Florence, and Errol Flynn) with a vague outward antagonist—society, perhaps? And somehow, through the grace of such strong characters and writing, it works. More

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    Still Holding Out for Mister J

    Here the focus will be on the Joker and the argument will be we have yet to see a proper rendition on the big screen (I’m not counting certain interesting videogame versions). Before beginning, one has to concede the Cesar Romero interpretation, whatever its genuine brilliance, was too tame by half to truly merit the top spot yet an argument can be made this is the closest to seeing the Joker in the flesh. More

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    TIFF Cinematheque presents a Summer in France: ‘La Femme infidèle’ documents the tragedy of a marriage

    La Femme infidèle Directed by Claude Chabrol Written by Claude Chabrol France, 1968 Imagine the perfect life. If you were Charles Desvallees (Michel Bouquet), you’d imagine that you had a placid, undemanding office job. You’d also imagine that your secretary was a young, bubbly ingénue in a mini skirt. After work, you’d imagine to drive […] More

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    TJFF 2012 Roundup: The good, the bad, and the ugly

    With the 20th Toronto Jewish Film Festival now behind us, it’s time to look back at all the films screened and determine which were the good, the bad, or the ugly. The Good OSS 117: Lost in Rio The most complimentary thing you can say about Michel Hazanavicius is something everyone acknowledged after his Oscar-winning […] More

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    TJFF 2012: ‘Naomi’ is a study of incurious people being unlikeable for unknowable reasons

    Naomi Directed by Eitan Tzur Written by Edna Mazia Israel/France, 2010 If prostitution is the world’s oldest profession, then tales of infidelity must be one of the oldest forms of storytelling. From the bible to Nabokov, Adele’s entire discography to Adrian Lyne’s entire filmography, the devastating consequences of adulterous liaisons have provided ample inspiration for […] More

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    Movie Poster Tribute To Stanley Kubrick

    A few weeks ago we published an article about artist David O’Daniel’s recently created silkscreen limited edition posters for The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, Nosferatu, The Evil Dead, Psycho, Robocop, and The Terminator. I felt it wouldn’t hurt to promote the artist once again and showcase his tribute to director Stanley Kurbick. The posters were […] More