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    Our Eyes On You: Voyeurism in ‘Gone Girl’ and ‘Maps to the Stars’

    At least outwardly, David Fincher’s Gone Girl is a film defined by its knife-edge turnabouts, orchestrated with an elaborate tangle of dread brought upon by a thrilling script, masterful direction, as well as an equally noteworthy score. If not for David Fincher’s sway, however, Gillian Flynn’s tale of passionate, domestic misanthropy could have easily atrophied […] More

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    NYFF 2014: Kyle’s 5 Favorite Films and Other Ephemera

    Underneath the bass drops and the electronic harmony of the garage music scene of 1990s Paris is melancholy and loneliness. The parties are bursting with verve and energy, but when the music stops, so does that joy. Hansen-Løve’s examination of a young DJ over the course of twenty years is warm and tender, an incredible look at the pros and cons of following your passion, allowing art to be your escape, and the joy of music. More

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    TIFF 2014: ‘Maps to the Stars’ is a huge disappointment

    There’s something theatrical about this new version of Cronenberg. Not in the way we think of Stratford or Shaw. More like pseudo-artistic interpretive theatre that happens during one’s experimental phase in University. Maps to the Stars is a colossal disappointment, offering stilted performances, a disjointed and predominantly ineffectual script, and bewilderingly bad sound design. What appears on the surface to be an interesting dialogue on child stars, the vapid, all-consuming and destructive nature of celebrity, and the superficial nature of Los Angeles very quickly reveals itself to be something else altogether – the tired, lazy half-measures of an auteur riding on his own coattails. More

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    TIFF 2014: ‘Maps to the Stars’ never quite comes together

    Hollywood could easily be the perfect fantasy world of Cronenberg’s obsessions. The themes associated with body horror, from the fascination with decay to the battle between body and mind, are staples of the torrid extremes of Tinsel Town. In 2012, David Cronenberg’s son, Brandon, tackled these ideas with his feature debut Antiviral. That film explores a dystopian future in which the obsession with celebrity is taken to extremes of consumption. In Antiviral, the masses purchase meat grown from their favourite celebrity’s cells and head to a special clinic in order to be infected with the same venereal strain as their Hollywood Idol. The film externalizes the growing cultural obsession with fame, and concentrates that obsession through corporeality and sex. More

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    Week in Review: Make a horror movie with Guillermo Del Toro

    YouTube announced a contest this week in collaboration with director Guillermo Del Toro in which entrants with YouTube channels can submit a short horror story to be judged by Del Toro, with the winner getting the opportunity to sign a deal with Del Toro’s Legendary Pictures. The contest is called “You Tube Space House of […] More

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    Hey You Geeks!! Podcast# 32: Meh About Fall Movies

    Fall movie season is right around the corner. This week, we take a look through the slate of movies coming this Fall in search of anything exciting coming from the genre world. Unfortunately, the pickings are slim, with a few movies we’re excited about (Mockingjay, Birdman, The Zero Theorem, Interstellar), a bunch we’re mildly intrigued […] More

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    TIFF: ‘Mommy’ leads lineup of Canadian films

      The Toronto International Film Festival may just be getting too big with the absurd number of films it has each year, but it still makes room for some hometown heroes. TIFF has just announced its lineup of Canadian Films that will screen at this year’s festival. Leading the group is first time filmmaker Xavier […] More

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    Cannes 2014: ‘Maps to the Stars’ the darkest comedy of Hollywood aspiration

    Los Angeles, the city that homes the superstars and studios responsible for mainstream cinema culture, has consistently received its due criticism from those who either reject it or work within it. Look no further than Thom Andersen’s nearly comprehensive Los Angeles Plays Itself to see the town utilized as an easy space for shooting, a battleground for the melodrama of the privileged, and home field for telling stories about the storytellers. The business-driven artistic culture that pervades the town has been satirized in Who Framed Roger Rabbit, The Player, and Barton Fink to the point that a simple update of finger-pointing to the 21st century may be seen as a rehashing. Bruce Wagner’s crazy script for David Cronenberg’s Maps to the Stars instead paints the town as a machine capable of rehashing through its own ghostly presence of the-machine-that-once-was: a cycle so foreboding that it must be spoken of through horror tropes. More

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    Most Anticipated Films by Auteurs for 2014

    While some of us are still playing catch-up with films we missed in 2013, there’s no shame in looking ahead to the seemingly marvelous lineup of films that await us cinephiles in 2014. The buzz will be fast and contagious with festivals like Sundance, Berlinale, Rotterdam, and Cannes  just around the corner; below is my […] More