More stories

  • Map to the Stars
    in

    TIFF 2014: ‘Maps to the Stars’ is a huge disappointment

    There’s something theatrical about this new version of Cronenberg. Not in the way we think of Stratford or Shaw. More like pseudo-artistic interpretive theatre that happens during one’s experimental phase in University. Maps to the Stars is a colossal disappointment, offering stilted performances, a disjointed and predominantly ineffectual script, and bewilderingly bad sound design. What appears on the surface to be an interesting dialogue on child stars, the vapid, all-consuming and destructive nature of celebrity, and the superficial nature of Los Angeles very quickly reveals itself to be something else altogether – the tired, lazy half-measures of an auteur riding on his own coattails. More

  • in

    TIFF 2014: ‘Maps to the Stars’ never quite comes together

    Hollywood could easily be the perfect fantasy world of Cronenberg’s obsessions. The themes associated with body horror, from the fascination with decay to the battle between body and mind, are staples of the torrid extremes of Tinsel Town. In 2012, David Cronenberg’s son, Brandon, tackled these ideas with his feature debut Antiviral. That film explores a dystopian future in which the obsession with celebrity is taken to extremes of consumption. In Antiviral, the masses purchase meat grown from their favourite celebrity’s cells and head to a special clinic in order to be infected with the same venereal strain as their Hollywood Idol. The film externalizes the growing cultural obsession with fame, and concentrates that obsession through corporeality and sex. More

  • Maps to the Stars - Mia Wasikowska
    in

    Cannes 2014: ‘Maps to the Stars’ the darkest comedy of Hollywood aspiration

    Los Angeles, the city that homes the superstars and studios responsible for mainstream cinema culture, has consistently received its due criticism from those who either reject it or work within it. Look no further than Thom Andersen’s nearly comprehensive Los Angeles Plays Itself to see the town utilized as an easy space for shooting, a battleground for the melodrama of the privileged, and home field for telling stories about the storytellers. The business-driven artistic culture that pervades the town has been satirized in Who Framed Roger Rabbit, The Player, and Barton Fink to the point that a simple update of finger-pointing to the 21st century may be seen as a rehashing. Bruce Wagner’s crazy script for David Cronenberg’s Maps to the Stars instead paints the town as a machine capable of rehashing through its own ghostly presence of the-machine-that-once-was: a cycle so foreboding that it must be spoken of through horror tropes. More

  • in

    TADFF 2013, Days 5 and 6: ‘Odd Thomas’ and ‘The Last Days on Mars’

    In Odd Thomas, the titular clairvoyant character (Anton Yelchin) can see dead people and bodachs (spirit creatures that alert him to future deaths). Working with the local police, headed by a chief played by Willem Dafoe, Odd goes around stopping people before they do bad things, but one potential criminal, a guy he lovingly dubs Fungus Bob, causes him all sorts of problems. More

  • Dollhouse cast photo
    in

    The Televerse #87- Dollhouse with Kate Rennebohm

    This week on the podcast, we’re back to more balanced split of television, between comedy, genre, and drama. First we break down the week in comedy, focusing on Bob’s Burgers and Veep, then genre, focusing on Orphan Black and Doctor Who, then reality, and finally drama, particularly Mad Men and The Americans. Then we spotlight […] More

  • Dollhouse cast photo
    in

    The Televerse #87- Dollhouse with Kate Rennebohm

    This week on the podcast, we’re back to more balanced split of television, between comedy, genre, and drama. First we break down the week in comedy, focusing on Bob’s Burgers and Veep, then genre, focusing on Orphan Black and Doctor Who, then reality, and finally drama, particularly Mad Men and The Americans. Then we spotlight […] More

  • in

    ‘Hyde Park on Hudson’ is ambitious, but a muddled and half-formed period drama

    Hyde Park on Hudson Directed by Roger Michell Written by Richard Nelson United Kingdom, 2012 There’s been a debate brewing online lately over whether or not movies should stray beyond being roughly two hours. Those in favor of shorter films argue that there’s no discernible advantage in making movies so lengthy aside from filmmakers being […] More

Load More
Congratulations. You've reached the end of the internet.