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    Twin Peaks, Ep. 1.03, “Zen, Or The Skill To Catch A Killer” expands the mystery with dances and dreams

    Throughout his career, David Lynch has always paid tribute to the role of dreams in his art and storytelling. He once described his appreciation of the form as such: “Waking dreams are the ones that are important, the ones that come when I’m quietly sitting in a chair, letting my mind wander. When you sleep, you don’t control your dream. I like to dive into a dream world that I’ve made or discovered; a world I choose … right there is the power of cinema.” Lynch’s best works are the pieces that exist perfectly in an elusive feeling, where you’re unsure if you’re awake or still dreaming. Blue Velvet is a walking nightmare for poor Jeffrey Beaumont that shows him the worst of life, while Mulholland Drive’s narrative defies categorization on what is reality and what is a dream. More

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    Obsessed with Pop Culture: Best of the Week

    Boardwalk Empire, Ep. 5.08: “Eldorado” leaves only the dust and ash of regret That it seemed obvious for the series’ finale to send Nucky out was a bit of a given, considering the telegraphed nature of the flashback conceit which had been building for the entirety of this season. There were glimpses of hope, and […] More

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    Twin Peaks, Ep. 1.02: “Traces To Nowhere” establishes oddly effective beats of investigation

    After the tour de force performance that was the pilot of Twin Peaks, the most important of the many questions raised was how on earth this would be able to sustain a weekly series. Its vision was so unique and its oddness so carefully calibrated that it was easy to understand why so many of the critics who first reviewed it and loved it gave it zero chance of mainstream success, even while you could also understand why ABC would take a chance on its vision. More

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    Obsessed with Pop Culture: Best of the Week

    The Hype Cycle: Contenders Arrive in Theaters Excuse the absence in this column for the last few weeks. I’ve been covering the Chicago International Film Festival, catching up with a few of the Foreign Language Oscar contenders while there. Now however, many of these movies are finally making their ways into theaters, providing an extra […] More

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    Twin Peaks, Ep. 1.01: “Northwest Passage” is brilliant world-building, wrapped in plastic

    In the nearly 25 years since Twin Peaks debuted on ABC, the show has achieved an almost mythic status in the canon of television. Not only has it influenced a legion of other shows, but its various elements and images have become indelible parts of pop culture. Appreciation of cherry pie and damn good coffee. A lady with a log that she treats like a beloved pet. A dwarf dancing in a room with red curtains and a zig-zag carpet. When people think of Twin Peaks, they think of its oddities, and with good reason: the surreality is so distinct that it lingers long after the details surrounding it have faded. More

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    40 Great Horror Films for the Halloween Season 3

    Movies 20-11 20. A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984) directed by Wes Craven Before he was the one-line-loving, crassly, campy class clown known as Freddy, Fred Krueger was the stuff of genuine nightmares. Scarred and grinning in his striped wool sweater, Fred prowls the dreamscape realm of the local high schoolers, the children upon whom […] More

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    Sound On Sight begins a journey to ‘Twin Peaks’

    Last week, the television world received a fairly earth-shattering piece of news, with the announcement that Twin Peaks would return to television in 2016 with a nine-episode limited series run on Showtime. Long hoped for and speculated about by fans, the news is about as promising as could be hoped for: All nine episodes will be written by show creators David Lynch and Mark Frost, and directed by Lynch in his first time directing for television in over two decades. In multiple interviews since the reveal, Frost has been coy about any specifics, but the general tone of the conversation is that the two feel the time is right and that they genuinely want to tell a story in this world again. More

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    Departure Day: When it comes to TV, is closure important?

    If you happen to follow a decent number of TV critics on Twitter, you may have noticed a minor eruption of late. A schism has emerged, prompted by accounts like The Cancellation Bear, which concerns itself solely with the topic of whether or not series are likely to survive based on current ratings patterns. That […] More

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    ‘The Fade Out’ #2 demonstrates a mastery of the noir genre

    Using the murder of a Hollywood starlet as a catalyst to expose the web of dark secrets that runs through the City of Angels, the award-winning team of Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips have put together the most intriguing comic of 2014. Brubaker & Phillips’ new crime noir is just getting started but it is already destined to be a cult classic. Brubaker’s name has been synonymous with the noir genre from the very start of his career, but The Fade Out is different from his books that came before it. Set in the Hollywoodland era of the 1940s, with painstaking attention to historical detail, The Fade Out relishes in classic Hollywood tropes – so much so that every page looks like a storyboard from an Anthony Mann film. The Fade Out is clearly, a labor of love from its creative team who go the extra mile by assembling a series of supplementary content that really helps readers get into the mind set of the time. More

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    ‘Twin Peaks’ set to return in 2016

    In a surprise announcement earlier today, David Lynch and Mark Frost followed up their recent tweets by confirming that Twin Peaks would indeed be returning to television. Twin Peaks is set to return on Showtime in 2016, with all nine episodes of the new series being directed by Lynch himself, Deadline reports. Dear Twitter Friends: That gum you […] More

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    Is the Boring Gateway Character Worth It?

    Jack Shephard was originally supposed to be played by Michael Keaton, and he was going to die in Lost’s pilot episode. After his death, the first to be killed by the smoke monster (that honor ended up going to the plane’s pilot, played by Greg Grunberg), Kate would take over as the leader and primary […] More

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