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Watch the entire ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’ as directed by Wes Anderson

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Stanley Kubrick and Wes Anderson are without a doubt, two of the most beloved filmmakers. While it might not seem so obvious, both directors have much in common. For starters, they both use music to great effect in their works and they both have their own unique visual style. Nathan Hartman took Kubick’s 2001 a Space Odyssey and recut it to musical cues from Anderson’s films, injecting Anderson’s usual whimsy into Kubrick’s cold, dark sci-fi masterpiece. On his website, Hartman describes his reasoning for creating the project:

Kubrick and Anderson are known for their visuals. See a screenshot of either and its easy to recognize, but the key is their adamant and meticulous nature towards their camera framing. It is a defining characteristic of both directors and an area where each bleeds into the others preferences.

Beyond just the visual aspect, both Anderson and Kubrick also define themselves with the sound and music choices in their work. Who hears Blue Danube without thinking 2001 or The Kinks without remembering Royal Tenenbaums?

Could Anderson and Kubrick be mashed up for an entire film? Could they dance together for that long? For me, it was worth exploring, if only for the sheer fun of it. So I recut 2001: A Space Odyssey into a Wes Anderson picture entitled, Wes Anderson’s 2001: A Space Odyssey.

Playing with the visuals in Kubrick’s masterwork, 2001 allows for an easy editing template. Long on shots and short on sound, cuts could be put together rather seemlessly. Suddenly, the Dawn of Man sequence is scored to Mark Mothersbaugh tracks from Rushmore, spaceships fly to The Beach Boys, and a two-and-a-half hour film is cut down to an hour-and-twenty-minutes.

 

You can watch the trailer for Nathan’s cut below. To view the entire film, head over to Hartman’s website.


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