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    ‘Batman and Robin’ Eternal #3- Spy Hijinks and Emotional Flashbacks

    Working off a story from Scott Snyder and James Tynion, Tim Seeley turns in a script for Batman and Robin Eternal #3 that is simultaneously full of bouncy Bat- (or Robin) banter with some choice douchiness from Red Hood and scenes both past and present featuring the dark psychological effects of the Scarecrow’s fear toxin. This is somehow connected to the “mysterious” Mother, which our heroes are no closer to finding her identity. But there is still plenty of conflict as Dick Grayson’s Spyral colleague Poppy Ashemoore goes off the reservation, and threat level of the series increases when an important supporting character is put in the crosshairs of Mother and her creepy operatives. More

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    ‘Batman and Robin Eternal’ #1 is filled with dark secrets and intense action

    Batman and Robin Eternal #1 is a genre spanning (superhero and possession horror), kick in the pants start to this weekly comic event. Scott Snyder and James Tynion set up a creepy, overarching storyline for the series by exploring the tragic side of being a Robin. (They don’t usually get out alive.) Artists Tony Daniel and Sandu Florea use speed lines, little circles, and every tool in the action cartoonist’s toolbox to give the comic a hyperactive feel as the various Robins swing, kick, and ride into action while wisely utilizing full page spreads for surprise reveals that burst the nostalgia bubble of “Batman and Robin forever”. By the end of Batman and Robin Eternal #1, readers will see the relationship between the Caped Crusader and his various sidekicks in a new, complicated light. More

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    ‘Batman: The 12 Cent Adventure’ is More of a Trailer than a Story

    Batman: The Twelve Cent Adventure #1 has methodical pacing and repetitive writing from Devin Grayson. But it does its job as a prelude to the “War Games” event by showing how isolated both Spoiler and Batman are and the breadth of Gotham’s organized crime in the too short shoot out scene. In movie terms, it’s a damn good trailer, but doesn’t stand on its own as a story except for some insights into the character of Spoiler and her relationship to the Batman family. More

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    ‘Gotham Academy’ #7: Is this really it for Damian and the ‘GA’ gang?

    It’s a shame that Gotham Academy #7 seems to be a one-off because there is so much potential for Damian as a regular member of the cast. If you’re looking to get into Gotham Academy, this probably isn’t the place. The impetus for the story and the emotional beats rely on a familiarity with the characters that isn’t established here. You should go pick up the first six issues (and the excellent Endgame tie-in), and then race your way back. Because it’s well worth it. More

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    The 13 Most Iconic Joker Moments

    What makes the Joker such an exciting villain isn’t just his diabolical deeds, but the way he acts as the perfect foil to Batman. The Caped Crusader is a dark and brooding shadow, bound by morals, rules, and logic. The Clown Prince of Crime is a manic, posturing madman, ruled by chaos, entropy, and a disregard for anything…including himself. Everything the Joker does is to make a point, or deliver a punchline even if it comes at his own expense. He knows no limits and pushes Batman to his own limitations like no our villain. The Joker is to Batman as Kurt Cobain was to Axl Rose, or as Aaron Burr was to Alexander Hamilton, a perfect antithesis in every imaginable way. Here’s a look back at 13 of the most iconic Joker moments. These are the moments that made the Joker the one of the most memorable and recognizable villains in all of fiction, across any medium. More

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    ‘Whatever Happened to the Caped Crusader?’ is a good ending for Batman

    After Bruce Wayne’s death in Final Crisis, DC Comics gave legendary comics creator and novelist Neil Gaiman the chance to pen one “last” Batman story in the vein of Alan Moore’s What Happened to the Man of Tomorrow, which was the last Superman story before Crisis on Infinite Earths. Equal parts love letter and thesis statement, Gaiman and artist Andy Kubert open the comic showing the usual Gotham City skyline, but with the names of important Batman creators, like Bill Finger and Jim Aparo in the background. More

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    Damian Wayne’s Greatest Hits

    SPOILERS! (Only if you’ve been living in your own Bat-cave that is…) It was a bold move for writer Grant Morrison to introduce an illegitimate love-child to Bruce Wayne, but then again Grant Morrison is a bold man (is bold the word I’m looking for?). Even bolder still was Grant Morrison’s decision to cap off […] More