More stories

  • in

    Sons of Anarchy, Ep. 7.11, “Suits of Woe”: Jax comes to grips with a disturbing truth

    For an episode that has so many scenes that could all individually be described as great, this episode continues to not have enough happen in order to properly justify the run time. The majority of the action is important, but letting every scene breathe and take as much time as possible to play out undercuts the levity of the scenes where the drawn out nature of an interaction instills everything with increased emotion. Having a conversation between Gemma and Nero be the same length as one between Althea and Unser, or close to it, attempts to place them on the same level and this doesn’t make any sense. There are few transitional scenes this week, only increasingly long and drawn out exchanges as Gemma’s actions in relation to Tara’s death come into focus and get passed around the club. In an episode where long-awaited fireworks are expected, the sudden refusal to put Jax and Gemma in the same room is a disappointment and one that is not tempered by the prison murder of Lin or the semi-pointless car chase Jax takes part in. Finding the emotional heart of the show again this close to the finale after so many seasons of blood and guts is a good thing, but with over an hour of screen time filled with lots of tell and not a lot of show, the emotional heart isn’t balanced with anything else. More

  • Sons of Anarchy S07E01 Black Widower promo pic
    in

    Sons of Anarchy, Ep. 7.01, “Black Widower”: The Sons return to business as usual

    Coming off a bloody and shocking season finale, the final stretch of Sons of Anarchy kicks things off with nothing less than a bloody and shocking premiere. The actual action takes up less than a third of the episode, with most of the super-sized premiere ending up as time spent watching various gangs and family members talk in circles about last season’s events. With only a handful of episodes to iron out all of the conflicts from last year’s denouement, set up a proper season arc, and tie everything up in a satisfying manner, one would think Sutter and co. would have a sense of urgency when it comes to moving the plot along. Instead, a small number pieces on the chessboard are shifted a few spaces while everybody else stands around and observes the events unfolding. More

  • in

    Greatest TV Pilots: Sons of Anarchy

    Sons of Anarchy, Season 1, Episode 1“Pilot” Directed by Allen Coulter and Michael Dinner Written by Kurt Sutter Aired September 3rd, 2008 It was about time that television tackled the inner workings of an outlaw biker gang. Honestly, it’s rather shocking that it took so long. Kurt Sutter certainly knew what he was doing when […] More

  • Queer as Folk UK cast
    in

    The Televerse #137- Queer as Folk (UK) with Ricky D

    The dramas came to play this week, giving us lots to discuss on the podcast. First we look at the comedies, including the finale of Rick and Morty, then we talk some reality and genre, including another wedding-tastic episode of Game of Thrones, and we round things out with the dramas, including the finale of […] More

  • Queer as Folk UK cast
    in

    The Televerse #137- Queer as Folk (UK) with Ricky D

    The dramas came to play this week, giving us lots to discuss on the podcast. First we look at the comedies, including the finale of Rick and Morty, then we talk some reality and genre, including another wedding-tastic episode of Game of Thrones, and we round things out with the dramas, including the finale of […] More

  • in

    Sons of Anarchy, Ep. 6.01: “Straw” welcomes viewers back to Charming

    While Sons of Anarchy creator Kurt Sutter tends to favor the music montage sequence for beginnings and/or ends of episodes, this season six premiere – “Straw,” which may also be the penultimate season premiere for this series, since it is only planned to run through seven seasons – opens with a montage set to Jax’s narration as he reads from a journal entry he is writing for his sons. More

  • in

    ‘Pacific Rim’ a sometimes thrilling fever-dream mishmash of summer movie tropes

    If Calvin and Hobbes, those most delightful and beloved comic-strip characters, made a monster movie out of one of their fever-dream playtime japes, it would probably look a great deal like Pacific Rim. The sweaty, breathless determination with which the film’s main concept plays out, as well as how frequently it aims to top itself, is both charming and a mild hindrance. (Cartoonist Bill Watterson was able to get away with such boyhood tomfoolery because he was working with a much shorter amount of space and time.) Co-writer and director Guillermo del Toro has broken free of his almost quaint, homemade style in Pacific Rim, delivering, in many ways, the ultimate summer movie, for good and ill. More

  • in

    ‘Pacific Rim’, Guillermo Del Toro’s newest feature, gets its marketing kicked off with two viral clips and several posters

    Director Guillermo Del Toro has emerged as one of the more exciting fantasy filmmakers in the last decade. With features such as Blade II, Hellboy, and Pan’s Labyrinth, Del Toro effectively proved his ability to tell fascinating stories with otherworldly concepts, leading many to be excited at the news that the would be turning to […] More