Fred Stresing

‘Welcome to Showside’ #4 turns up the suspense

Welcome to Showside #4 continues to be both hilarious and suspenseful as Ian McGinty and Samantha Knapp make fun of Tinder and the emotional power of Gerard Way’s old band on tiny blue creatures while giving Kit and his friends a villain that is both powerful, entertaining, and certainly not monosyllabic in Frank. (Be sure to read his parts in your best Henry Rollins voice.)

‘Welcome to Showside’ #2- Of Monsters and Food Trucks

Welcome to Showside #2 is another fun installment in writer/artist Ian McGinty’s bouncy, anything goes all ages urban fantasy saga. In this issue, readers get to meet Belle’s little brother Toulouse, who is a bit of a nerd and scared of their father Mr. Stone, an eyepatch wearing demon hunter, who hates monsters (even adorable ones like Kit and Boo) and lives in a castle above Showside. The comic starts as a fun beach excursion complete with rad banter, a food truck excursion, and standing up to an annoying bully, who looks like the steroid fueled offspring before turning into another magical monster brawl. And between the eating and fighting, McGinty continues to develop the world of Showside, including the tension between humans and monsters as well as introduce the silliest (and sadly most powerful politically) character to date, Mayor Mayer.

‘Welcome to Showside’ #1 is a fun, immersive teen adventure comic

Welcome to Showside #1 is a partially light, partially dark introduction to the fantastic world of Showside as writer/artist Ian McGinty shows Kit and his close knit group of friends at play and at action in a bright, playful art style that looks like animation with a touch of retro video games. Throw in a funny backup story with art from Carey Pietsch (Marceline Gone Adrift), and Welcome to Showside #1 is a spoopy trick or treat for your eyes and funny bone with relatable characters and fantastic worldbuilding just in time for Halloween.

‘Munchkin’ #5 shows the problems with time travel

Munchkin #5 truly captures the ridiculous, wonderful, and confusing parts of time travel.(Ian McGinty illustrates the confusing part in a single panel time paradox.) It is also has a good combination of over the top and witty humor for fans of all comedic persuasions. It’s a great read for anyone still figuring out what the hell happened in Matt Smith’s last episode of Doctor Who.

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