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    The Blacklist, Ep. 1.13 “The Cyprus Agency” continues to frustrate

    The most essential and important part of a television show is having characters that the viewer inherently cares about and whose interests or concerns they care about as much as the characters themselves do. Without that, the show becomes a house of cards that grows evermore unstable as time goes on. Sure, the story drives the episodes from one point to another, but emotional connections aren’t made with the story or, if they are, it’s to a much lesser degree. No connections are made with characters and The Blacklist has created a story that is adequate with characters that, outside of James Spader’s Red, are completely weak and as close to one-dimensional as it gets. More

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    The Blacklist, Ep. 3.12: “The Alchemist” continues its bad streak

    If ever there was one word to sum up The Blacklist, that word would have to be frustrating. It’s not frustrating for the fact that it’s bad; that would be understandable and even acceptable. No, The Blacklist is frustrating because it is occasionally good and even when it’s bad, glimpses of how the show could be good shine through and that might be worse. It’s almost as if the producers are taunting its audience with a look at how things on the show could be, but probably never will. More

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    The Blacklist Ep. 1.11, “The Good Samaritan Killer” frustratingly shows promise

    When the new shows for fall 2013 were being announced, it seemed all but guaranteed that The Blacklist would the standout from the bunch. It had a great lead in the form of James Spader and a solid episodic premise that just might border on intrigue, but instead, The Blacklist proved to be consistent at one thing among others: disappointment. That was true for the first half of the season, at least. Could this new year mean a better, more improved show? It doesn’t seem likely. More

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    The Blacklist, Ep. 3.09, “Anslo Garrick, Part 1” is exciting, but feels like a stall

    In the first of two parts, “Anslo Garrick, Part 1” has everyone’s favorite international criminal Red (James Spader) in need of protection from Anslo Garrick, a spurned colleague from Red’s past. Garrick ,somehow, knows that Red is working with the FBI and knows precisely what they’d do with Red if word got out that someone wanted Red’s head on a silver platter. More

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    The Blacklist, Ep. 1.07, “Frederick Barnes” shows the series’ inconsistencies

    The Blacklist has proven over seven episodes that it excels at being consistently inconsistent from week to week. Some episodes make the show look like it’s a lost cause that should never be viewed by anyone ever. If that’s all the show would ever be, not a problem. Just pack it in and move on to the next thing. The problem is that The Blacklist reaches moments of actual excellence. It somehow tricks the viewer into thinking that they’re watching something of value until the next episode, where the show will likely spin around and smack you for thinking such silly thoughts. That’s just the way it is with The Blacklist: some reach pretty high on the quality scale and others fall well below that mark. More

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    The Blacklist, Ep. 1.04: “The Stewmaker” improves with a more interesting villain

    “The Stewmaker” opens to a very Silence of the Lambs-esque sequence that is simultaneously creepy, captivating, and tonally out of place with other aspects of the episode. Most of the episode does work. Anything actually involving ‘The Stewmaker’ himself (which isn’t nearly enough of the episode) is extremely compelling television. The problem isn’t ‘The Stewmaker’. The problem is the peripheral junk happening to the side of this interesting character. More

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    The Blacklist, Ep. 1.03, “Wujing” moves the show in the right direction, but not fast enough

    “Wujing” attempts to to make the Arrow-esque concept of bringing down a list of bad guys a tad bit more interesting with Reddington (James Spader) being approached by an associate of the intelligence community’s urban legend Wujing (The Dark Knight’s Chin Han) to decipher a CIA transmission that would allow the Chinese to identify an American spy and then take him out. Meanwhile, Keen (Megan Boone) takes a closer look at Tom (Ryan Eggold). More

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    The Blacklist, Ep. 1.01, “Pilot” is imperfect, trope-filled, yet shows promise

    The Blacklist’s first episode, Pilot, begins with former government agent Raymond Reddington (James Spader) walking into FBI headquarters and promptly gives himself up to the powers that be. Promising information on famed terrorist Ranko Zamani, the only catch being that he’ll only speak to one person: Elizabeth Keen(Megan Boone). Clearly that’s a high-ranking federal officer, right? Wrong. Elizabeth Keen is a green agent who has yet to work a single day at the FBI. More