More stories

  • in

    ‘Obi Wan and Anakin’ #1 is brilliant and awkward

    Obi Wan and Anakin #1 boasts some beautiful setting work and planet designs from Marco Checchetto although his faces are inconsistent, especially with Anakin and another padawan, who looks like a more cartoonish version of Mace Windu. Charles Soule gives his lead character distinct voices and a tense kind of camaraderie as they leap and explore this supposed abandoned planet. However, his plot runs out of steam in the last third of the book, which seems like the first few minutes of an away mission in Star Trek. So despite its interesting conversations about ethics and politics, Obi Wan and Anakin #1 ends being a bit of a mixed bag as far as plot and art and definitely has room for improvement. More

  • in

    ‘Daredevil’ #1 sets up a new status quo in art and story

    Daredevil #1 Written by Charles Soule Art by Ron Garney Colors by Matt Milla Letters by Clayton Cowles Published by Marvel Comics When opening a copy of Daredevil #1, it looks  like the newsprint of a 1970s comic (Maybe, a Frank Miller written and drawn issue of Daredevil.). New series artist Ron Garney (Captain America) […] More

  • in

    ‘Uncanny Inhumans’ #2 – Inhuman Methods

    Overall, the Uncanny Inhumans (featuring Johnny Storm and Beast) are doing big things in their corner of the All-New, All-Different Marvel Universe. Soule puts forth the effort to include Beast, who is relatively new to the new cast, and have the cast interact with him to varying degrees in some fantastic scenes. The interactions between all of the players make the comic worthwhile given their history with one another. Johnny Storm being called out on his relationship with previously dating Medusa’s sister Crystal is complicated, yet funny to think about in the light of the events of the story. Uncanny Inhumans #2 is another big step in Kang’s plan of dominance, and another step for Charles Soule, Steve McNiven, and the rest of the art team to prove why the Inhumans are larger than life and can give the X-Family a run for their money. More

  • in

    ‘She-Hulk’ #12 is a fitting end to Charles Soule’s superhero/legal drama

    She-Hulk #12 Written by Charles Soule Art by Javier Pulido Colors by Muntsa Vicente Published by Marvel Comics She-Hulk #12 ties up pretty much every loose end in Charles Soule’s run while also leaving the character open for more stories by he, Javier Pulido, and company or for another creator to jumpstart their run. This is really the best way a run […] More

  • in

    Death of Wolverine #4 is a noble end for a legendary character

    In Death of Wolverine, Charles Soule, Steve McNiven, Jay Leisten, and Justin Ponsor had the tough job of killing off one Marvel’s most popular characters in a way consistent with his legacy of his character. Death of Wolverine #4 contains the actual “death”, and Soule, McNiven, and company stick the landing. Except for Doctor Cornelius’ supervillainous monologues, Soule’s script is terse and minimalist. Wolverine doesn’t say much, but he does a lot in keeping with his early characterization in Chris Claremont and John Byrne’s Uncanny X-Men where he would be the one still scrapping and fighting even after the Hellfire Club had taken out the other X-Men. In this last story, Soule examines all the different sides of Wolverine from lab experiment and animal to soldier, superhero, and samurai. And Steve McNiven’s art continues to be a treat from his landscape portraits of the Nevada desert to Wolverine’s last, visceral hand to hand battles. Inker Jay Leisten tightens his lines and elucidates the details of Cornelius’ lab as well as the lines on Wolverine’s determined faces. Colorist Justin Ponsor continues to be one of my personal favorites as he sets a different mood for each scene from a washed out brown for one final flashback of Weapon X to the sterile environment of Cornelius’ lab and one last walk in the sunlight. More

  • in

    Death of Wolverine #3 Has Iconic Imagery, Average Story

    Death of Wolverine #3 Written by Charles Soule Pencilled by Steve McNiven Inked by Jay Leisen Colors by Justin Ponsor Published by Marvel Comics Even if Charles Soule’s script reads like a compilation of the best solo Wolverine stories all rolled into one miniseries, Death of Wolverine #3 is another shining example of why Steve McNiven is one of the best […] More

  • in

    2014 Baltimore Comic Con: Marvel Universe Panel

    Marvel’s presence at Baltimore Comic Con was low tech and fairly quiet with no slides or big announcements, but fans in the audience got to ask a variety of questions to Marvel’s creative talent from stupid ones like “Is the new Thor a lesbian?” to ones about the fates of various characters, the amount of creator/editorial […] More

  • in

    Death of Wolverine #1 Hits All the Expected Beats

    Written by Charles Soule Pencils by Steve McNiven. Inks by Jay Leisten Colors by Justin Ponsor. Letters by Chris Eliopoulos Standard Cover by McNiven, Leisten & Ponsor Published by Marvel Comics. Death of Wolverine #1 is the culmination of a storyline begun by Paul Cornell in which Wolverine lost his mutant healing factor, and the first issue of a […] More

  • in

    Charles Soule Signs Exclusive Deal with Marvel

    How does Charles Soule do it? If you ignore the answers provided by the comic writer himself on his personal blog, it is almost impossible to imagine how one man can spread himself so thin across eight different titles between Marvel, DC, and Oni Press. At the moment he currently writes Inhuman, She-Hulk, and Thunderbolts […] More

  • in

    10 Best Comics of 2013: Part One

    2013 was a big year for comics, both mainstream and independent. DC celebrated Superman’s 75th birthday with the launch of the much hyped (and delayed) Superman Unchained by superstar creators Scott Snyder and Jim Lee. There were also the big crossover events “Trinity War” and its follow up Forever Evil which will continue into 2014.  This year also marked […] More

Load More
Congratulations. You've reached the end of the internet.