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    LFF 2014: ‘The Imitation Game’ is a fitting tribute to shamefully unsung heroes

    The mysterious and secretive figure of Alan Turing has undergone something of a political and cultural renaissance in the UK over the past few years. A young mathematic prodigy, Oxford graduate, and cryptographer par excellence, he was ushered into the ultra top secret Bletchley Park programme during the Second World War and tasked with the impossible: to break the German military codes through a captured sequencer which could potentially offer billions of responses to any clandestine communication. Socially incompetent and ruthlessly dedicated, Turing willingly threw himself into the arena of cerebral combat, along the way erecting much of the intellectual and theoretical infrastructure of the modern computing world. But as a closeted homosexual his treatment at the hands of the authorities in the post-war period should cause the great British bulldog to hang its head in shame, with he and his team’s contribution to the continuation of civilisation remaining cloaked for over half acentury due to the Official Secrets Act. Former Prime Minister Gordon Brown would later make an official public apology on behalf of the British government for “the appalling way he was treated,” while the Queen granted him a posthumous pardon on Christmas Eve 2013. More

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    Port Townsend Film Festival: Day Three closes with awards and an encore for ‘Amira & Sam’

    And so it ends… Sunday marked the close of the 15th annual Port Townsend Film Festival.  As Annie Hall slouched across the massive outdoor theater screen, citizens and visitors adjourned for another year, sated on film, food and abundant sunshine.  Whether there will be a breakout film from this year’s line-up remains to be seen, […] More

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    ‘Begin Again’ is pure pop perfection

    Begin Again Written and directed by John Carney 2013, USA Movies that make you feel good on their own terms are a rare breed.  John Carney’s latest film, Begin Again, doesn’t need to pander or lobotomize itself to entertain you.  It doesn’t need villains twirling their mustache or hysterical spouses throwing plates against the wall […] More

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    SFIFF 2014: The Good, The Bad, and The Mediocre

    Begin Again Formerly known as Can a Song Save Your Life?, writer-director John Carney’s latest film marks a return to the New York music scene in an uplifting tale of reinvention and rediscovery. Keira Knightley stars as Greta, an amateur singer-songwriter left heartbroken in the Big Apple after her douchebag musician boyfriend Dave (Adam Levine) […] More

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    Sundance 2014: ‘Laggies’ a feat of storytelling that gives women room to be indecisive and flawed

    Laggies Directed by Lynn Shelton Written by Andrea Seigel USA, 2014 Keira Knightley stars in the new movie by director Lynn Shelton (Humpday, Your Sister’s Sister) that seeks to reason why a young woman hasn’t grown up yet. It’s a film about hesitancy and not knowing exactly what you need to achieve happiness. Swimming upstream […] More

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    Sunday Shorts: ‘Steve’, starring Colin Firth

    Today’s film is the 2010 short Steve. The film is written and directed by Rupert Friend, and stars Tom Mison, Kiera Knightley, and Colin Firth. Firth has built a long career of critically acclaimed roles in film and television, from Pride and Prejudice and The English Patient to A Single Man and Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, winning his first Academy Award […] More

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    Extended Thoughts on ‘Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl’

    Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl Directed by Gore Verbinski Written by Ted Elliott, Terry Rossio, Stuart Beattie, and Jay Wolpert Starring Johnny Depp, Orlando Bloom, Keira Knightley, Geoffrey Rush Captain Jack Sparrow is the worst thing that ever happened to Johnny Depp’s career. The prevailing wisdom is that the constantly […] More

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    More Equal Than Others: Six Films of 2012 Done Better

    For better or worse, films don’t exist in a vacuum. If literature derives from itself, and, according to Marshall McLuhan, the content in any new medium is always the same as in the old, then films don’t exactly have a wealth of opportunities to be original. You can always compare a film to one that […] More

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