More than “Just Peachy”: Nova #1 Takes Flight

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Cover by Ed McGuinness, Dexter Vines, & Marte Gracia
Cover by Ed McGuinness, Dexter Vines, & Marte Gracia

Nova #1
Written by Jeph Loeb
Illustrated by Ed McGuinness
Colors by Marte Gracia
Cover by Ed McGuinness, Dexter Vines, & Marte Gracia
Published by Dan Buckley

There is a lot that can be expected from issues of Nova in the following months.  With a writer like Jeph Loeb (Daredevil: Yellow, Fallen Son: The Death of Captain America) attached to this project, there are definite high hopes for readers.  Marvel has added another title to their long list of NOW! restarts with Nova #1 (released Feb. 20th, 2013).

Nova #1 begins in narration and dialogue from a “new” main character, Sam Alexander (who was introduced as the current Nova during the Avengers vs. X-Men event), and his father Jesse who was a Nova Corps member seventeen years ago.  This first issue mainly focuses on the relationship with Jesse and Sam.  Unfortunately, going any deeper into a description of this issue would ruin the whole thing so we might have to leave it at that (sorry folks).

Now, Sam Alexander’s Nova isn’t new to the NOW! Universe.  As mentioned before, Nova made brief appearances during the AvX saga: first in a One-Point issue and finally in the epic battle at the end of the series.  Sam is definitely a kid.  He’s immature and has a lot of growing up to do – but that’s just it – Marvel and Jeph Loeb are setting out to explore Sam’s new life as a part of the Nova Corps.  He’s got to learn how to use his powers, learn about the new kinds of responsibilities he has, and probably has to figure out how to be a high school student all at the same time.  Does this seem like déjà vu? [Haha…Peter Parker reference, anyone?]  Much like how comic book fans felt reassured when The Avengers was in the hands of Joss Whedon, fans can let out a small sigh of relief knowing that Jeph Loeb is at the reigns of this project.

The writing in Nova #1 is simple: nothing too complex or dense for a reader to take in, but it’s the simplicity of Loeb’s writing in this debut issue that really packs a punch.  Loeb’s writing, as always, emotes exactly what Sam is feeling and given the context of issue #1, it has potential to will speak to readers.  The issue itself isn’t overly emotional, but Loeb does a superb job of balancing the humor and drama together…but let’s not forget Ed McGuinness’ (Deadpool, Hulk) artwork.  McGuinness’ style is solid, and like Loeb’s writing in this issue, it’s simple.  The lines in Nova #1 aren’t overly aggressive and have no reason to be (compared to The Indestructible Hulk illustrated by Leinil Francis Yu), and when you add in Marte Gracia’s (All New X-men #1, The Amazing Spider-Man #654) colors, readers will receive a classically drawn, colored, and written book.

Nova #1 is a well-balanced book.  As mentioned before, with the team of Jeph Loeb, Ed McGuinness, and Marte Gracia on the job, readers can expect a series that is more than “just peachy”.

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