Scott Pilgrim vs. The World

‘Phonogram: The Immaterial Girl’ #4 is a Precious Little Comic

While it may initially appear irrelevant to the rest of the plot, Phonogram: The Immaterial Girl #4 may be one of Gillen, McKelvie, Cowles, and Wilson’s finest hours as a creative team. By using the tropes and tics of a popular and defining work, they manage to tell a story that both plays with the central theme of the arc and the central theme of the work referenced in astoundingly creative ways. It’s fun, electric, and even just a bit precious.

‘Scott Pilgrim vs. the World’ brings back the classic arcade game

When the film adaptation of Scott Pilgrim was released in 2010, it was like an explosion of colour and two-tone jingles. To the casual eye, the film is a classic – albeit awkward – love story between Scott (Michael Cera), a loveable loser, and the intriguing yet aloof Ramona Flowers (Mary Elizabeth Winstead). In order to date her, Scott has to defeat the League of Evil Exes – Ramona’s exes. All seven of them.

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‘Scott Pilgrim vs. the World’ fights the odds to earn very high praise

Ultimately Scott Pilgrim vs the World is a film that its admirers promote loudly and proudly whenever the opportunity presents itself. They did it from day it opened theatrically and still do today. The problem is that few people pay attention to the rumpus. The numbers do not lie: the picture cost close to 90 million dollars and struggled to earn 47 million during its theatrical run.

The Once and Future Kings: ‘The World’s End’ is a triumph for Pegg, Frost, and Wright

To exit a film directed by Edgar Wright is to be reinvigorated by the state of modern cinema. He’s now made his fourth feature-length film, The World’s End, and it’s tempting to rate it as his best work yet. But when you consider his others—Shaun of the Dead, Hot Fuzz, and Scott Pilgrim vs. The World—the challenge becomes differentiating these by how many slight nitpicks may crop up from story to story. Like most directors of his generation, Wright’s work is heavily influenced by the pop culture of his childhood. Unlike many of his peers, though, Wright is able to translate that affection and hyper-literate awareness into something fresh, exciting, and intelligent. As such, The World’s End is as peerless as a mainstream film gets.

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