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    Gods are Forever in ‘Justice League’ #47

    With the clock winding down and with only 3 issues in the War to go, not all of the characters are at the forefront in Justice League #47, but it works lest the already packed title become overstuffed with players. With the main artist back on to finish the event, the “Darkseid War” should begin to wrap up character arcs and pick up steam to change the landscape of DC Universe in issue 50. More

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    Conflict Builds in ‘The Dark Knight III’ #2

    The Dark Knight III #2 has some wooden dialogue and a chase scene that is a little too similar to last issue’s magnificent one, but it does a great job establishing the characters of Carrie Kelly’s Batman and Lara while setting up the conflict between humanity and the Master Race. The Wonder Woman backup story is a real treat and positions Diana as a wild card in the issues to come in her roles as both warrior and mother. (Risso nails this part of her as she swings a sword with a baby slung on her back.) More

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    Godhood Calls in ‘Justice League’ #46

    Justice League #46 Writer: Geoff Johns Artist: Francis Manapul Colorist: Francis Manapul Letterer: Rob Leigh Publisher: DC Comics Being caught in the middle of a cosmic war between the two of the most powerful beings in all existence can be difficult to manage. Wonder Woman makes it look easy even with six of her team members […] More

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    ‘Dark Knight III’ #1 is triumphant and tragic

    The Dark Knight III #1 is bombastic in its themes and scale and type of art drawn by Andy Kubert, Klaus Janson, and Brad Anderson. There are ideological differences between gods and mortals, the law and citizens hinted at or show vividly on the page with blood flowing like red wine on the Gotham rooftops leading to the kind of conflict that spawns one of the biggest, final page cliffhangers in recent memory. More

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    Superhero Corner: Cumberbatch gets ‘Strange,’ Batfleck deals with the past, Oscar winner joins ‘Wonder Woman’

    Michael Stuhlbarg set to join impressive ‘Doctor Strange’ cast Who would’ve thought Marvel could create such an eclectically interesting cast as they have for the one with Doctor Strange? The Wrap reports that Michael Stuhlbarg, who was just seen in Steve Jobs and Trumbo, is set to join the cast for Doctor Strange, which is […] More

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    The Darkseid War shifts in ‘Justice League’ #45

    The Darkseid War rages on and is proving to be the biggest and largest story DC has told yet in the New 52 and DCYou era through the Justice League title. Readers are treated to an artistic switch with Francis Manapul and Brian Buccellato, who were the team that ushered in a new era for The Flash at the New 52’s inception to give us this aftermath of the insanity that went down in issue #44. More

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    In ‘Final Crisis’ heroes die, but comics live forever

    On the surface, the title of Final Crisis feels like a misnomer. How can there even be a “final” crisis? There will always be a DC Universe, there will always be earth-shattering dangers, and there will always be heroes to ensure the end is never really the end. But the strength of Final Crisis lies in that it recognizes this, and uses this fact as the crux of the entire event: the promotional tagline was, after all, “Heroes die. Legends live forever.” The characters and stories of the DC Universe are timeless, never-ending, and very much alive in the way that language can be said to be alive. It’s from this angle that writer Grant Morrison attempts to comment on and interact with DC’s complex and often unwieldy history. While Final Crisis is not the final challenge these characters will ever face (because nothing ever will be until the day DC stops publishing — and at this point that’ll likely be the same day CNN puts it “Nearer, My God, to Thee” video to use), one walks away from it feeling like they’ve just experienced the ultimate in everything the DC Universe was, is, and will be. More

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    ‘JLA’ #1 is an Average Comic with Great Art

    JLA #1 is another feather in Bryan Hitch’s artistic cap as he excels at showing superheroes in action along with labs, helicopters, explosions, and even a decent flirty interaction between Clark Kent and Lois Lane. However, his plot maybe suffers from some hypercompression as ideas, threats, and allies are introduced at a rapid pace without proper establishment. There are also a few story logic issues, The Flash and Green Lantern are written interchangeably, and Cyborg is kind of treated as deus ex machina. These misfires make JLA #1 an average comic with great art. More

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