Parks and Recreation

ACOD

‘A.C.O.D.’ a scattered dramedy with an overqualified ensemble

It’s not a particularly good sign that the end credits for A.C.O.D. are more revealing and poignant than the film preceding them. As the credits roll on one half of the screen, a montage of (presumably) the film’s crew members plays on the other half, as they identify as being either Adult Children of Divorce (hence the titular acronym) or not, defining when or if their parents split up, how, and why.

Thursday Comedy Roundup: TBBT 7.04, Crazy Ones 1.03, Parks and Rec 6.04

The Thursday night comedies are all quite hit and miss this week, as some fail to amuse but successfully move the story forward. The best episode out of the three is probably The Big Bang Theory’s. Despite the fact it doesn’t really do much to move the story forward, it definitely provides the most entertainment.

Thursday Comedy Roundup: TBBT 7.03, Crazy Ones 1.02, Parks and Rec 6.03

Following its rather rocky start to the season, The Big Bang Theory delivers an outstanding episode this week. “The Scavenger Vortex” continues with this new pattern that the show has adapted since the start of the season- although the episode doesn’t exactly move the story forward, it does work as a great platform for some of the characters to interact and this week the pairings are even more hilarious than last week.

Thursday Comedy Roundup: TBBT 7.01 & 7.02, Crazy Ones 1.01, Parks and Rec 6.01 & 6.02, MJF Show 1.01 & 1.02

After a fairly unimaginative season finale, the premiere for season seven explores how the characters have adapted without Leonard once again. Despite the slight decline in comedy throughout season six, last season wrapped up well enough. The only problem was the repetition of a familiar storyline: Leonard going away. This time round a number of things have changed for the characters, making for a highly anticipated season seven premiere. Unfortunately the two parter is a little disappointing. The first episode is the better of the two, as we see what the characters have been up to since Leonard’s departure.

‘The To Do List’ a messy, raunch-filled comedy with an overqualified ensemble

The amount of time it takes to exhaust the goodwill one has accrued towards an overqualified and bursting ensemble cast is roughly 70 minutes, if The To Do List is any indication. The film’s high concept and its performers, from Aubrey Plaza to Connie Britton to Alia Shawkat to Clark Gregg, are enough to engender some interest for a while, but eventually, The To Do List peters out, squandering away its likability on a strange, ballsy-for-being-irresponsible message and a muddled third act.

Thursday Comedy Roundup: ‘Community’ 4.11 & ‘Parks & Rec’ 5.21

This week’s Community comes from the pen of Oscar-winning screenwriter Jim Rash, a.k.a. Dean Pelton. It appears to be an episode about the dissolution of Troy and Britta’s relationship, but at its heart it’s just another episode about Troy and Abed. In that respect, it is far more effective than its gimmicky premise would suggest. If anything holds it back it’s that Danny Pudi isn’t nearly as good at impersonating Troy as Donald Glover is Abed. The reveal that it’s all an act explains this, but doesn’t quite serve to redeem it.

For those familiar with the brilliant Angel episode “Smile Time,” it’s impossible to view “Intro to Felt Surrogacy” without thinking back on Joss Whedon and Ben Edlund’s masterpiece. One of the many impressive things about “Felt Surrogacy” is how quickly it steps out from under that shadow. Given how frequently the fourth season of Community has employed high-concept episodes as a crutch, it’s somewhat ironic that the most ambitious episode to date would be the one in which it finally establishes a unified voice.

Thursday Comedy Roundup: ‘Community’ 4.09, ‘Parks & Rec’ 5.18, & ‘Archer’ 4.13

For those familiar with the brilliant Angel episode “Smile Time,” it’s impossible to view “Intro to Felt Surrogacy” without thinking back on Joss Whedon and Ben Edlund’s masterpiece. One of the many impressive things about “Felt Surrogacy” is how quickly it steps out from under that shadow. Given how frequently the fourth season of Community has employed high-concept episodes as a crutch, it’s somewhat ironic that the most ambitious episode to date would be the one in which it finally establishes a unified voice.

Thursday Comedy Roundup: ‘Community’ 4.08, ‘Parks & Rec’ 5.17, & ‘Archer’ 4.12

“Herstory of Dance” is a surprisingly sweet episode of Community. What initially seems like a rather lazy Abed plot, another example of him attempting to enact fictional tropes in the real world, is granted another, deeper level when Brie Larson’s Rebecca assists him in his hijinks. In that moment, it transcends the emptiness of Abed’s arc this season and becomes truly affecting.

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